Margaret E. Bostrom
"Margie"
31 Years Old

November 6, 1964 to August 16, 1996

Margaret Bostrom, of Suffield and Windsor, Connecticut, was best described by her sister the night of her funeral. What follows is taken from that night. "It is a fitting tribute and makes us proud parents of both our daughters." We were all very proud of Margaret professionally. We have many mementos of her academic life because of her dedication to higher education we set up a college fund for her niece and nephew in her memory. Margaret spent her adult life earning a PhD in Clinical Psychology. She worked at the federal prison for less than ten months before she was murdered by her husband. We want the world to know what type of sister, daughter, and aunt our Margie was and how she touched the lives of those who knew her well.

Margie had very long, beautiful finger nails. When we were young we would tease her, out of jealousy, on how they got that way. But if you knew her, her hands were one of her most expressive features. We'll always remember her beautiful hands.

Margie was extremely organized. She prided herself on her neatness. She loved to buy containers to put everything in, from hair fasteners, to closet shoe racks and boxes for sweaters. You name it - she had it - and labeled it, and knew exactly where it was.

Margie loved animals, from the horses we had growing up, to her dog, Calie, a golden retriever and her cat, Sebastian. We teased her for spoiling her dog. On her way home from Lewisberg, which is five hours away, she let Calie ride on her lap in the car. We'll remember her for the love she had for animals.

Margie loved to shop. I loved to shop with her! She could always find a bargain and had impeccable taste. I joked that we should spread some of her ashes at an outlet mall!

Margie loved my children. When I had Abby she watched her during her summer break. Abby was only three months old. Margie loved to hold her, dress her, and was so very protective of her. Even as a seven year old Abigail Margaret could do little wrong in her eyes. My kids love her - her smile and laughter. Margie loved her parents and sisters. She loved holidays and our Swedish traditions. Although, at Christmas, she had a tendency to knock over the tree. She was so happy when she moved back from San Diego because she could visit more often. In fact she was on her way home the weekend of her death.

She always bought the greatest birthday gifts, and never forgot to send a card. She loved eating out, having veal Marsala, even with my kids. She loved reading, her work and helping others, which added value to a world gone mad.

Our hope is that justice will be served to give us the courage to go on. We had her for thirty-one years, ten months and ten days.

CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE MURDER

Dr. Margaret E. Bostrom, 31, of Suffield and Windsor, Connecticut, was killed Friday, August 16, 1996. She had been stabbed thirteen times in the chest with a butcher knife. One blow was so violent that it went through her slender body. Any one of four wounds would have been fatal. Additional slicing cuts on her arms, hands and chin were sustained when the victim attempted to defend herself. Her estranged husband, Mitchell F. Paster, was taken into custody.

Apparently, they had argued about her wish to divorce and he accused her of being unfaithful. In their argument they both said things that were meant to hurt. She went upstairs to prepare to go to her parents' home in Connecticut and then to a week long conference on Cape Cod. While she was in the shower he got the knife and waited for her to get out. After the murder he called his mother, who works in a lawyer's office. Then he called 911 and reported that he had stabbed his wife.

However, when questioned later by the FBI, he denied any recollection of what actually happened. The judge denied bail and Mitch has been incarcerated since that day, awaiting trial for felony murder. There have been nine postponements and the next trial date is November 4, 1997. The US Attorney assures us that the government has a solid case. We want to believe him.

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Margaret E. Bostrom